Less noise and air pollution at the port

Cuxhaven offers new shoreside electrical power supply station for freight-ships

copyright: Andreas Burmann/NPorts

It’s a first among the five Lower Saxon seaports of port operator Niedersachsen Ports (Nports): Cuxhaven now offers shoreside electrical power supply station for freight-ships. This will reduce air pollution, noise and carbon dioxide production. The new system was inaugurated by Dr. Bernd Althusmann, Lower Saxon Minister for Trade, Labour, Transport and Digitalization. The facilities include a converter station and an eight metres high access point. It was built these past months in collaboration with EWE Netz and Siemens at the offshore port.

“The seaports in Lower Saxony, especially Cuxhaven, reaffirm their leading position by inaugurating today’s shoreside electrical power supply system. In addition to innovating in wind turbines, Cuxhaven now also gives transport vessels the opportunity to be supplied with cleaner power,” Althusmann said at the commissioning ceremony.

“We are aiming to continuously improve Cuxhaven in terms of technology and sustainability. Adding the shoreside electrical power supply station has been an important further step in this direction,” added Hans-Peter Zint, chairman of Cuxhaven Port Association.

Even if ships, by comparison, are a fairly environmentally friendly transport mode given their large tonnages relative to their energy consumption, they do produce, in absolute terms, significant emissions. During her stay at a port, a ship, in order to function properly, will consume approximately as much energy as hundreds of households. The new shoreside power supply station at the port of Cuxhaven means that ships now do not have to use their onboard power generators, which run on diesel or heavy fuel oil. To this end, the shoreside electrical power supply station will use transformers and a converter to transform public AC-power (400 V/50 Hz) into power usable on the ship (440 V/60 Hz). The power cables, measuring approximately four inches in diameter, are safely connected to the vessel via the eight metres high access towers. The system conforms to international technical standards and works with all common ship systems.

“Ports must do their part for the sake of environmental and climate protection. They must find the best possible solution so that they can be both as efficient as possible and, at the same time, reduce air and noise pollution to the maximum possible extent,” explained Holger Banik, managing director of Niedersachsen Ports GmbH & Co. KG.

 

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